Can Fibroids Become Cancerous?

Although fibroids are predominantly non-cancerous – approx one in 1,000 cases per year are found to be malignant (cancerous)
Therefore the chances of your fibroids being life threatening is very slim.
fibroid-uterus-5120

How do I know I have fibroids?

The main symptoms involving fibroids is ‘heavy periods’. This is caused by fibroids growing in the womb and making the womb bigger, thus creating a larger surface of womb lining that has to bleed every month. Also – the pressure caused by fibroids may disrupt normal blood flow. During menstruation you may find that you loose clots of blood – these can vary in size and resemble pieces of liver. Some women experience constant bleeding from one month to the next and develop anaemia as a result. Severe fibroids can also cause ‘infertility’, this occurs when large fibroids enlarge and distort the womb – hence making it virtually impossible for the fertilised egg to plant. They can make it difficult to maintain a pregnancy, thus lead to ‘miscarriage’.

How could I tell if I’m anaemic?

If you are bleeding excecessively  – then you are likely to be suffering from anaemia. You should consult your doctor if you have a heavy blood flow including experiencing any of the symptoms below:
  • Exhaustion
  • Dizziness
  • Sore tongue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Headaches
  • Sore tongue

What is the treatment for fibroids?

Your treatment will depend on the size and causes of your fibroids, i.e. taking HRT during the menopause (increased levels of oestrogen) may stimulate and accelerate fibroid growth. Your doctor may prescribe progesterone to counterbalance the problem. A pelvic ultrasound is usually performed to determine the size of your fibroids. Heavy bleeding can be stemmed by taking drugs. Most women fear that their fibroids will lead to a ‘hysterectomy’, but this is not always the case as a less invasive surgical technique can be performed called a ‘myomectomy’ where the womb is left intact.

Leave a Reply